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The social game VRChat just opened up a whole bunch of new possibilities for sign language support as an accessibility feature by adding hand tracking in the most recent update. VRChat is currently in Early Access on Steam and other platforms. Hand tracking for the time being is only supported for Quest because of “platform and technical restrictions,” but support could very well be expanded at some point in the future.

“This isn’t just the ability to use your real hands via the Quest’s powerful finger tracking, it also means you don’t have to use your controllers at all in VRChat,” the eponymous developer notes about the patch. “You can move around, jump, and use your menu, all with just your hands.”


The social game VRChat just opened up a whole bunch of new possibilities for sign language support as an accessibility feature by adding hand tracking in the most recent update.

VRChat is currently in Early Access on Steam and other platforms. Hand tracking for the time being is only supported for Quest because of “platform and technical restrictions,” but support could very well be expanded at some point in the future.

“This isn’t just the ability to use your real hands via the Quest’s powerful finger tracking, it also means you don’t have to use your controllers at all in VRChat,” the eponymous developer notes about the patch. “You can move around, jump, and use your menu, all with just your hands.”


  1. Possible world
  2. Fun 
  3. Universe 
  4. Ok




While the addition of hand tracking was not explicitly designed to expand accessibility, players quickly began to explore the possibility space afforded by the feature. The game developers known on Twitter as Benaclejames and Thefoxipso were among the first to realize that hand tracking could be used for sign language, taking to the social media platform with their discovery. The news immediately began to attract attention within the community.


  • One
  • Two
  • Free